Showing posts with label Mullard. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Mullard. Show all posts

Thursday, May 3, 2018

The Fisher EL37

Not too many manufacturers used EL37 tubes. I've only seen them in Fisher and Knight gear.


Wednesday, March 16, 2016

Mullard EL84 1958

I dig the British bulldog in this ad for the EL84. I have a quad of EL84 in my Heathkit AA151 if I ever get to it but I am on the way. It is about 6 projects down the list lol.



Tuesday, December 23, 2014

1927 Raleigh Mullard Tube Amp

I love the wiring and look of this 1927 Mullard amplifier.
Beautiful!!!!
Early radios produced little power, so extra amplifiers were often added. There was no industry producing them on a large scale, but they could always be built at home, like this magnificent creation of the late 1920s made by PFW Bush. Big amplifiers need plenty of raw power to work on, and this one had a hefty power supply. It also used two valves to drive the loudspeaker, one pushing, the other pulling. A similar arrangement is still used in modern amplifiers. - See more at: http://www.sciencemuseum.org.uk/online_science/explore_our_collections/objects/index/smxg-35205#na
Early radios produced little power, so extra amplifiers were often added. There was no industry producing them on a large scale, but they could always be built at home, like this magnificent creation of the late 1920s made by PFW Bush. Big amplifiers need plenty of raw power to work on, and this one had a hefty power supply. It also used two valves to drive the loudspeaker, one pushing, the other pulling. A similar arrangement is still used in modern amplifiers. -
Early radios produced little power, so extra amplifiers were often added. There was no industry producing them on a large scale, but they could always be built at home, like this magnificent creation of the late 1920s made by PFW Bush. Big amplifiers need plenty of raw power to work on, and this one had a hefty power supply. It also used two valves to drive the loudspeaker, one pushing, the other pulling. A similar arrangement is still used in modern amplifiers. - See more at: http://www.sciencemuseum.org.uk/online_science/explore_our_collections/objects/index/smxg-35205#sthash.73zUXhFJ.dpuf
Early radios produced little power, so extra amplifiers were often added. There was no industry producing them on a large scale, but they could always be built at home, like this magnificent creation of the late 1920s made by PFW Bush. Big amplifiers need plenty of raw power to work on, and this one had a hefty power supply. It also used two valves to drive the loudspeaker, one pushing, the other pulling. A similar arrangement is still used in modern amplifiers. - See more at: http://www.sciencemuseum.org.uk/online_science/explore_our_collections/objects/index/smxg-35205#sthash.73zUXhFJ.dpuf
 
Early radios produced little power, so extra amplifiers were often added. There was no industry producing them on a large scale, but they could always be built at home, like this magnificent creation of the late 1920s made by PFW Bush. Big amplifiers need plenty of raw power to work on, and this one had a hefty power supply. It also used two valves to drive the loudspeaker, one pushing, the other pulling. A similar arrangement is still used in modern amplifiers. - See more at: http://www.sciencemuseum.org.uk/online_science/explore_our_collections/objects/index/smxg-35205#na
Early radios produced little power, so extra amplifiers were often added. There was no industry producing them on a large scale, but they could always be built at home, like this magnificent creation of the late 1920s made by PFW Bush. Big amplifiers need plenty of raw power to work on, and this one had a hefty power supply. It also used two valves to drive the loudspeaker, one pushing, the other pulling. A similar arrangement is still used in modern amplifiers. - See more at: http://www.sciencemuseum.org.uk/online_science/explore_our_collections/objects/index/smxg-35205#na
Early radios produced little power, so extra amplifiers were often added. There was no industry producing them on a large scale, but they could always be built at home, like this magnificent creation of the late 1920s made by PFW Bush. Big amplifiers need plenty of raw power to work on, and this one had a hefty power supply. It also used two valves to drive the loudspeaker, one pushing, the other pulling. A similar arrangement is still used in modern amplifiers. - See more at: http://www.sciencemuseum.org.uk/online_science/explore_our_collections/objects/index/smxg-35205#na
Early radios produced little power, so extra amplifiers were often added. There was no industry producing them on a large scale, but they could always be built at home, like this magnificent creation of the late 1920s made by PFW Bush. Big amplifiers need plenty of raw power to work on, and this one had a hefty power supply. It also used two valves to drive the loudspeaker, one pushing, the other pulling. A similar arrangement is still used in modern amplifiers. - See more at: http://www.sciencemuseum.org.uk/online_science/explore_our_collections/objects/index/smxg-35205#na√
Early radios produced little power, so extra amplifiers were often added. There was no industry producing them on a large scale, but they could always be built at home, like this magnificent creation of the late 1920s made by PFW Bush. Big amplifiers need plenty of raw power to work on, and this one had a hefty power supply. It also used two valves to drive the loudspeaker, one pushing, the other pulling. A similar arrangement is still used in modern amplifiers. - See more at: http://www.sciencemuseum.org.uk/online_science/explore_our_collections/objects/index/smxg-35205#sthash.73zUXhFJ.dpuf
Early radios produced little power, so extra amplifiers were often added. There was no industry producing them on a large scale, but they could always be built at home, like this magnificent creation of the late 1920s made by PFW Bush. Big amplifiers need plenty of raw power to work on, and this one had a hefty power supply. It also used two valves to drive the loudspeaker, one pushing, the other pulling. A similar arrangement is still used in modern amplifiers. - See more at: http://www.sciencemuseum.org.uk/online_science/explore_our_collections/objects/index/smxg-35205#sthash.73zUXhFJ.dpuf

Saturday, September 15, 2012

Monday, November 30, 2009

Friday, June 12, 2009

Tech Tube Valves Blackburn, UK AKA Mullard



I really hope this pans out to be one of the most important new tube companies going into production. They are planning to build new tube designs on the same location as the famous Blackburn Mullard plant. A friends dad worked there for many years so I've heard a few stories about the place. First and foremost quality reigned supreme. I've run many mullard tubes and they have been among my favorites. The cool thing about tech tube valves is that they are going into production with some of the most often used tubes on the market 12AX7 or ECC83, 12au7 or ecc82, and 12at7 or ecc81. They are making rather large claims like there new products should rival even vintage mullard tubes. Now that is all very nice to say but if they pull it off valve or tube heads everywhere will be very happy. Have you seen primo 12ax7 tube prices lately??

Anyhow for those who haven't seen it yet they have a vintage film on their site of the old mullard production facility showing how tubes are made. This is simply amazing. It is a must see for all die hard tube fans.

Click here for video http://www.techtubevalves.com/about_us/film_reels.php